What is a human rights framework?

Implementing a human rights framework can improve service delivery to women from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.


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­­­­­­­­­There are things your organisation can do to meet best-practice standards in service delivery to CALD women. A Human Rights Framework for Improving Service Delivery to CALD Women is a practical measure that can be implemented at the level of policy and procedure and at the level of client interactions. It incorporates both the need for cultural competence and the rights of CALD women and their children to be safe from sexual assault, domestic and family violence.

The principles of the Human Rights Framework for Improving Service Delivery to CALD Women are:

  • Consultation

  • Participation

  • Collaboration

  • Accountability

  • Non-discrimination and equality

  • Empowerment.

A human rights framework works best if it is integrated across the organisation so the Human Rights Framework for Improving Service Delivery to CALD Women includes two sections: Principles for Organisational Engagement and the Implementation Tool.

The Principles for Organisational Engagement suggest ways to:

  • implement policy and procedure; 
  • develope strategies at the level of broad principles for practice and
  • develop these types of documents.

The Implementation Tool suggests ways to:

  • Put human rights first

  • Develop cross-cultural knowledge

  • Develop reflective practice

  • Implement respect

  • Incorporate feedback

  • Ensure accessible interpreters

  • Keep your code of ethics alive

  • Develop cross-cultural networks

  • Implement evaluation.

The document is set out to provide managers with information and ideas on how to improve practice however a worker might also find the second section useful even if organisational change is yet to be implemented.

The Human Rights Framework for Improving Service Delivery to CALD Women can be accessed here as a PDF or here as a RTF.

 

This resource was developed by The Australian Muslim Women's Centre for Human Rights in collaboration with 1800RESPECT.

 


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